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  • Please choose a work below to view abstract and full report:

    Ashley Laverock

    Ashley Laverock
    2012 Fellowship


    Learn more and read research report about Tilman Riemenschneider's St. Andrew

    Learn more and read research report about Benjamin West's Arethusa

    Ashley Laverock is a doctoral candidate in Art History at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Art History from Southern Methodist University and her Master of Arts in Art History from Tufts University. Her dissertation focuses on the visual hagiography of St. Margaret of Antioch in thirteenth-century stained glass across Europe. As the 2012 recipient of the Mellon-Funded Graduate Fellowship in Object-Based Curatorial Research, Ashley studied Tilman Riemenschneider's St. Andrew in the High Museum of Art's permanent collection. To complete her research she traveled to Berlin, Germany, where she consulted with experts on German sculpture, and to Würzburg, Germany, where Riemenschneider lived and worked.


    Cecily Boles

    Cecily Boles
    2012 Fellowship


    Learn more and read research report about Jean-Baptiste Defernex's Portrait of Antoine-René de Voyer de Paulmy d'Argenson

    Cecily Boles is a doctoral candidate in Art History at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Her research interest centers on Early Modern sculpture, particularly portraiture. She received her B.A. From the University of California, Riverside in 2005 in French Literature and Art History Administrative Studies. Cecily interned at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California Museum of Photography, and The Phillips Collection. Later she worked in Education at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. In 2009, she received her M.A. from the University of Toronto in Art History, which laid the ground work for her article: "The folded mozzetta: an overlooked motif in the portraits of Gian Lorenzo Bernini," in Sculpture Journal 20.2 (2011).


    Andi McKenzie

    Andi McKenzie
    2013 Fellowship

    Andi McKenzie is a PhD student in the Art History Department of Emory University. She also became Assistant Curator of Works on Paper at the Michael C. Carlos Museum in 2011. Her most recent exhibitions include Conserving the Memory: Fratelli Alinari Photographs of Rome and Mirroring the Saints: The Jesuit Wierix Collection from De Krijtberg, Amsterdam. McKenzie's research interests focus on the intersections between Catholicism and indigenous spirituality in Latin American art, and printmaking in early modern Germany and the Low Countries. McKenzie received her B.A. in Studio Art from Berry College and her M.A. in Art History from the University of South Florida.


    Elliot Wise

    Elliot Wise
    2013 Fellowship

    Elliott Wise is a doctoral candidate in Northern Renaissance Art History at Emory University. His research focuses on the way art functions in the devotion, exegesis, and religious practice of late medieval and Early Modern Europe. He is particularly interested in Eucharistic, liturgical, and Marian imagery and the way it is nuanced by the spiritual traditions of the monastic and mendicant orders. Wise currently holds a Jane and Morgan Whitney Dissertation Fellowship at The Metropolitan Museum of Art where he is studying the impact of Middle Dutch mysticism on the fifteenth-century painters, Rogier van der Weyden and Robert Campin.


    Catherine Barth

    Catherine Barth
    2014 Fellowship

    Catherine Barth is currently a second year PhD student in the Art History Department at Emory University. She is originally from Chesapeake, VA and completed her B.A. in English and Cultural Studies at the College of William & Mary in 2012. Catherine studies modern and contemporary art at Emory, focusing specifically on 20th century American photography. Photographers of interest include Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, Minor White, Wynn Bullock, and Garry Winogrand. Her current research centers on issues of public and private space, temporality, technology, and socio-political change in modern photography.


    Kira Jones

    Kira Jones
    2014 Fellowship

    Kira Jones graduated in 2008 from the University of Georgia with bachelor's degrees in classical culture and Latin, at which point she decided to pursue her Ph.D. in Greek and Roman art history. She has excavated with Dr. Bonna Daix Wescoat at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods in Samothrace and pursues a number of interests outside Greece and Rome, such as the impact of antiquity on later periods and the art of the Ancient Americas. She is currently researching her dissertation, "Domitian and Minerva at Rome: Iconography and Divine Sanction in the Eternal City" at Emory University.